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2,500 militants on Pak border – Indian Military force

AT least 2,500 separatist guerrillas are waiting near the Pakistan border to cross into troubled Kashmir, a senior Indian army official has said.

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SRINAGAR

“Our figures show at least 2,500 terrorists awaiting to infiltrate across the LoC opposite the Kashmir region,” Major General J N Mukherjee, stationed in Srinagar, strife-torn Kashmir’s summer capital, told newspersons on Saturday.

“Of these, approximately 200 are opposite Kanzalwan, 250 opposite Machil, 200 opposite Kern, 150 opposite Tangdhar, 350 in Lipa Valley, 300 opposite Uri and Gulmarag and 500 in Muzaffarabad,” Mukherjee said.

Kanzalwan, Machil, Kern, Tangdhar, Lipa Valley, Uri and Gulmarag areas lie on the 740-km (463-mile) Line of Control which divides bitterly-disputed Kashmir between India and Pakistan. Muzaffarabad is the capital of Pakistan-controlled Kashmir.

Mukherjee said the Pakistan army provides training to separatist militants in 123 training camps. “…of which 42 (training camps) are in Pakistan, 70 in POK (Pakistan occupied Kashmir) and 11 on the Afghanistan border. As per our information, at least 3,000 terrorists are under training in various camps,” Mukherjee added.

He said separatist militants were being provided with sophisticated weapons and equipment by Pakistan, including missiles, rockets and “state-of-the-art communication systems.”

Mukherjee said the newly-formed Jaish-e-Mohammad militant group had recruited at least 5,000 people in Pakistan.

The Jaish-e-Mohammad (Army of Mohammad) group was recently launched by Masood Azhar, a Pakistani Islamic cleric released by India in exchange for 155 hostages aboard a hijacked Indian Airlines plane late last year.

More than 30,000 people have been killed in separatist violence in Kashmir since 1990. – Reuters

Hai, this is sri ram, I one of the General Assignment Reporter, at timesnowindia.com, We mainly cover timely news, educational and entertainment, sections. - Chief editor, politico-social activist, software engineer at Accenture India.

Education

Disappearing Idealism In Student Politics – the right kind of leaders

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In India, as in countries of the world, the student community has played an active role whether it be the freedom struggle, the socialist movement of the ’70s or Mandal agitations about a decade ago. Indeed, such movements have been the breeding grounds for leaders, who’ve contributed significantly to the national politics.

However, with the perceptions changing over a period of time, people have started questioning the relevance of students politics in India. Has it been reduced to mere slogan-shouting and futile strikes? Is there any room for political idealism in the process? Is it a stepping stone towards a political career for the student activist?

Remarked Digvijay Singh, minister of state for railways, and a former Jawaharlal Nehru University Students Union (JNUSU) general secretary (1979-80), “In our time, students movement was confined to idealism, which is disappearing rapidly these days.” He had founded a union named, `Students for Democratic Socialism’, during his days at JNU.

Recalling his term as the vice president (1973) and president (1974) of Delhi University Students Union (DUSU), union minister for law, justice, company affairs and shipping, Arun Jaitley remarked, “In those days, the students’ movement across universities got integrated with the national movement led by JP (Jai Prakash Narain). Student politics got transformed from campus issues to issues concerning national politics. All of us were groomed more as participants of national polity.” His term as DUSU president got intercepted by `Emergency’ as he was jailed.


Vijay Goel, Member of Parliament from Chandni Chowk, who served as DUSU president in 1977, considers student politics a training ground for political and administrative skills. “My stint helped me develop leadership and oratorial skills, and taught me how to handle community problems. It is definitely a good platform to enter politics depending upon the potential, interest and commitment of the individual,” he said. He felt that previously, “students unions were better organised and had much more say in college and university affairs. The leaders, too, were more assertive”.

The current JNUSU president Sandeep Mahapatra concedes that many former JNUSU presidents have used the presidency as a platform to join active politics. He described the four years of his association with the union as very challenging. “You get aware of the responsibilities of an elected representative. It makes you mature enough to deal with various people and handle difficult situations,” he said. Mahapatra is not averse to the idea of joining active politics “at some point of time”. An Akhil Bharati Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) activist, Mahapatra said: “You must put the values you’ve learnt during students politics to good use. ABVP has taught us to put nation before everything else.”

Former JNUSU president and a Student Federation of India (SFI) activist Biju Krishnan (1998-99) firmly believes in SFI’s slogan of `Study and Struggle’. “It is impossible to lead struggle unless one is sound in studies. Most JNU activists have outstanding academic records. Thankfully, muscle and money power has been kept away from JNU students movement,” he said.

The DUSU vice president and National Students Union of India activist Neetu Verma, who’s all set to contest for the president’s seat in this year’s elections remarked, “I have joined the movement without any political ambitions. It was a desire to work for the cause of students, which motivated me. As students representatives, we get to interact with politicians and we also become known in political circles. So the entry into politics becomes easier for a student activist.”

While acknowledging that violence should be discouraged, all the students activists affirmed that protests, agitation and strike for a genuine cause will always be resorted to when required.

Expressing concern over the fact that despite dominating the life of the nation, politics is not able to attract the best, Jaitley observed: “The pitfalls of politics are not too attractive. Today, the best minds are going into competitive professions and vocations.”

Admitting that “the thirst is lacking” among the present unions, which is in contrast to the vibrant student movement of the 70s, Mahapatra said, “Students have become career oriented and do not live for idealism.” Krishnan added, “There’s cynicism for the rot and degradation of politics. Political parties use students for their vested interests.”

Singh expressed the hope that exceptional student activists joining politics will contribute to the betterment of politics, society and the nation, while cautioning, “But only when you are idealistic and have the urge to play a role in national politics.”

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Disappearing Idealism In Student Politics – Indian Ethics of education -IEE

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Does the student movement throw up the right kind of leaders? Education Times finds out

In India, as in countries of the world, the student community has played an active role whether it be the freedom struggle, the socialist movement of the ’70s or Mandal agitations about a decade ago. Indeed, such movements have been the breeding grounds for leaders, who’ve contributed significantly to the national politics.

However, with the perceptions changing over a period of time, people have started questioning the relevance of students politics in India. Has it been reduced to mere slogan-shouting and futile strikes? Is there any room for political idealism in the process? Is it a stepping stone towards a political career for the student activist?

Remarked Digvijay Singh, minister of state for railways, and a former Jawaharlal Nehru University Students Union (JNUSU) general secretary (1979-80), “In our time, students movement was confined to idealism, which is disappearing rapidly these days.” He had founded a union named, `Students for Democratic Socialism’, during his days at JNU.

Recalling his term as the vice president (1973) and president (1974) of Delhi University Students Union (DUSU), union minister for law, justice, company affairs and shipping, Arun Jaitley remarked, “In those days, the students’ movement across universities got integrated with the national movement led by JP (Jai Prakash Narain). Student politics got transformed from campus issues to issues concerning national politics. All of us were groomed more as participants of national polity.” His term as DUSU president got intercepted by `Emergency’ as he was jailed.

Vijay Goel, Member of Parliament from Chandni Chowk, who served as DUSU president in 1977, considers student politics a training ground for political and administrative skills. “My stint helped me develop leadership and oratorial skills, and taught me how to handle community problems. It is definitely a good platform to enter politics depending upon the potential, interest and commitment of the individual,” he said. He felt that previously, “students unions were better organised and had much more say in college and university affairs. The leaders, too, were more assertive”.

The current JNUSU president Sandeep Mahapatra concedes that many former JNUSU presidents have used the presidency as a platform to join active politics. He described the four years of his association with the union as very challenging. “You get aware of the responsibilities of an elected representative. It makes you mature enough to deal with various people and handle difficult situations,” he said. Mahapatra is not averse to the idea of joining active politics “at some point of time”. An Akhil Bharati Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP) activist, Mahapatra said: “You must put the values you’ve learnt during students politics to good use. ABVP has taught us to put nation before everything else.”

Former JNUSU president and a Student Federation of India (SFI) activist Biju Krishnan (1998-99) firmly believes in SFI’s slogan of `Study and Struggle’. “It is impossible to lead struggle unless one is sound in studies. Most JNU activists have outstanding academic records. Thankfully, muscle and money power has been kept away from JNU students movement,” he said.

The DUSU vice president and National Students Union of India activist Neetu Verma, who’s all set to contest for the president’s seat in this year’s elections remarked, “I have joined the movement without any political ambitions. It was a desire to work for the cause of students, which motivated me. As students representatives, we get to interact with politicians and we also become known in political circles. So the entry into politics becomes easier for a student activist.”

While acknowledging that violence should be discouraged, all the students activists affirmed that protests, agitation and strike for a genuine cause will always be resorted to when required.

Expressing concern over the fact that despite dominating the life of the nation, politics is not able to attract the best, Jaitley observed: “The pitfalls of politics are not too attractive. Today, the best minds are going into competitive professions and vocations.”

Admitting that “the thirst is lacking” among the present unions, which is in contrast to the vibrant student movement of the 70s, Mahapatra said, “Students have become career oriented and do not live for idealism.” Krishnan added, “There’s cynicism for the rot and degradation of politics. Political parties use students for their vested interests.”

Singh expressed the hope that exceptional student activists joining politics will contribute to the betterment of politics, society and the nation, while cautioning, “But only when you are idealistic and have the urge to play a role in national politics.”

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Education

St George’s School, Alaknanda celebrates Onam @ Kerala #Traditional values

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Holy Child Auxilium School, Vasant Vihar organised a musical extravaganza ‘Rhythm ’ on August 23. The judges were G Pullinkala, D Pandaya and Rev Father Vijay Baretto.

The first prize for solo (vocal) went to G D Goenka School Vasant Kunj, group (vocal) was bagged by Carmel Convent Malcha Marg. First prize for group instrumental went to Fr Agnel School Gautam Nagar.

The rolling trophy was bagged by Carmel Convent for the second consecutive time. Apeejay School, Noida held its investiture ceremony on August 29. The new appointees received their badges from school principal Rajesh Hassija. The new prefectorial board was administered the oath of office by vice principal Neeta Bali.

Greenfields Public School, Dilshad Garden organised the 38th youth parliament on September 15. Former parliamentarian Govind Ram was the chief guest. He was accompanied by school principal Dr Manik Barsaley, vice principal S K Sharma and Rita Jain. Tanvi stood first. Shaily and Anushree stood second followed by Rahul, Vaibhav and Suhani at third position.

The students of Lilawati Vidya Mandir donated clothes, toys and eatables to ‘Palna’, an orphanage in Civil Lines. The missionary work was initiated by Urvashi, Vikram, Bharat and Rahul of class VIII-D. Class XI students of Sachdeva Public School, Rohini observed green week from August 18 to 23. The weeklong activity commenced with the inaugural speech by the school principal Ravija Prakash followed by an elocution competition. Poster making and slogan writing competition were also held.

The students also organised a march and staged a skit written by the students. Kiran Gambhir, principal, Sachdeva Public School, Pitampura was honoured with Dr S Radha Krishnan memorial national award – in appreciation of her outstanding contribution in the fields of education, literature, art and culture. Avantika Guru Draunacharya Award was conferred on Dr Surjeev Kohli, principal of Guru Tegh Bahadur 3rd Centenary Public School, Mansarover Garden for her valuable contribution and remarkable guidance in nation building, education and promotion of Indian art, culture, dance and music. GHPS, India Gate hosted an inter-school English extempore competition on August 22 organised by the directorate of education.

The judges for the day were Sudesh Arora and Annie Albin. Inderpreet Kaur of GHPS India Gate bagged the second position in the junior group while Jasmine Kaur of the school was placed third in the senior category. The junior wing of Adarsh School, Kirti Nagar celebrated environment week. The highlight of the week was a bicycle rally flagged off by director A K Sahgal.

The other activities included tree plantation, poster making, slogan writing and elocution contests. Laxman Public School celebrated a weeklong ‘sanskritik utsav’ as a part of its silver jubilee celebrations. School chairperson Shyama Laxman Agarwal and wife of school founder late Laxman Agarwal congratulated school principal Usha Ram and others for the resplendent performance.

Chief guests Yamini Krishnamurthy, Pavnesh Kumar and Narendra Chanchal gave away the prizes. The celebrations began with the annual Laxman Memorial inter-school English, Hindi, Sanskrit elocution and recitation with painting competition held on August 25. Laxman Public School came first overall but being the host school, the trophy was given to Springdales Pusa Road who came second. The weeklong celebrations consisted of music, dance, western music and orchestra competition. Shristi and Riya Sharma from the school won the first prize in the middle and junior group.

It also bagged the second position in group dance. St George’s School, Alaknanda welcomed the arrival of King Mahabali with a grand floral decoration competition. Petals of flowers and leaves were arranged in geometrical patterns. School principal Sara George lit the traditional lamp and inaugurated the function. Manav Sthali School (Junior Wing), Double Storey, New Rajinder Nagar presented its annual cultural event ‘fantasia’. The event was a panoramic fiesta of foot tapping dances, pulsating music and enthralling dramatics. The highlight was a satirical play Utopia and My Fair Lady an adaption of George Bernard Shaw’s classical play Pygmalion. The school choir was at best with ‘Ace of Base’. The function concluded with the citation ceremony. School founder Dr V K Bhatnagar congratulated the children for their performance.

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